Why are we here?

The first lecture of clinical chemistry, our lecturer, Professor Ojwang’ gave us titbits of advice which I’ve held dear to date. Amongst them he talked of the meaning of life. When you ponder, why am I here? What is the meaning of life? What is my purpose on this earth? Since from dust we came and to dust we shall return.

We are driven by fear. Fear of dying. I watched this documentary series called year million and they talk of an age whereby humanity will achieve immortality. We will begin by being able to delete the unwanted genes from our DNA. Is your mother short-tempered? You can eliminate that. Do you want a child who is super smart? Yes, please. You can preprogram their genetic sequence to generate the perfect human being. Which didn’t settle well with me because are we human without imperfections? Then we’ll reach a point whereby telepathy will be made possible to enable engineers and great minds to come up with formidable inventions but what are we without our privacy? Then we’ll be able to upload our minds onto a computer and be able to have a virtual world. This is to avoid death from physical injury such as road traffic accidents. Did I mention we’ll no longer work? Yes, robots will be doing everything for us meaning there will be a generation who’s wonder will be really? You used to work? What is that like? But of course there comes the fear of the robots turning against the human race. I hope you’ve watched Terminator.

Immortality brings about the question, how different would you live your life if death became a thing of the past? The fear of death, I want to believe, is what gives life meaning. We go to school, care about people, go for what we want because we’re afraid of regretting. Thinking about what could have been since we have an expiry date. It’s just a matter of when.

Not to digress, to paraphrase what professor Ojwang’ said, most of all, the essence of life is making and leaving an impact in society so that when you are gone, with all the academic knowledge you acquired in your lifetime, your contribution to the community will remain even as you lay 6 feet under. Build that school you think your community needs, start a dispensary… you have a role to play in community and the impact you make is what makes life worthwhile as you live and even after you are dead.

The impact you make is what makes life worthwhile. Tell me how felt after you last visited that children’s home. When did you last volunteer for something? Can you describe the satisfaction and sense of fulfillment that comes with it? You feel at peace and in line with your purpose when you go out of your way to help others. Both the less fortunate and the able.

This reminds me of a piece my mother shared with me a while back from the daily nation

The founders, Griffin, last words to Starehe boys were, ‘… This world is full of people who do their duty half-heartedly, grudgingly and poorly. Don’t be like them.

Whatever is your duty, do it as fully and perfectly as you possibly can.

And when you have finished your duty, go on to spare some time and talent in service to less fortunate people, not for any reward at all, but because it is the right thing to do.

Follow my advice in this and I promise you that your lives will be happy and successful.

May God bless you all. ‘

Profound. Serving gives life meaning.

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